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Does anyone have any Broadlook Diver Tips & Tricks to share?

A few questions to start off:

1) In Diver, can you search site:jigsaw.com and site:zoominfo.com for titles, companies and location? I can do the company search just fine with jigsaw which leaves me with names only.

2) In Diver, when searching site:linkedin.com, is there a string to search for "current title", "current company" and "specific industy groups"?

For example:
I want to search Diver - site:linkedin.com for current title of "Director of Procurement" OR "Director of Purchasing" where current companies are (TRANE OR CARRIER OR JOHNSON CONTROLS) in "greater new york city area" and search the following industries "building materials" OR "mechanical or industrial engineering".

3) Also, when exporting Linkedin information after magic dive, the company name is included in the same cell as title with a little box between them. I'd like it to export into its own cell if possible.

4) Has anyone perfected a way to get company phone/email directories? Maybe in xls, pdf or doc.

5) Lastly, has anyone had great success at the resume search for Diver? I'm having a horrible time with it.

I'd be curious to hear what your favorite thing to do with Diver is also! Pros/Cons etc...

Thanks in advance for your help! Hope everyone has a nice weekend!

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Hi Kelli,

The main point about Diver (that helps set the right expectations) is that it is a tool on top of search engines. Diver doesn't search; what it does is - it very quickly and efficiently processes your search results.
It doesn't have its own syntax; the syntax to be used on Google is Google's etc.

To use Diver one needs to be good at Boolean search. Strings that I use with Diver are somewhat different than the strings I use if I manually collect results, at least in one aspect: it's OK getting several hundred results (many more than "usual") because the collection of the info is automated.
I'll add more to this later and will try to address your other questions.

I wrote an article that has examples of searches a while ago and it's here: http://thetalentbuzz.com/2008/08/i-disagree-with-donato-diorio/

It would be interesting to hear how others use Diver.

Irina
Hi Irina,

I actually found your article earlier and it is a great read as always. My focus is to gain much more experience in Boolean search strings. Once I grasp the whole concept, different strings and I'm able to keep them organized, I know I'll be on the right step. :) That is my focus this weekend actually.

I look forward to hearing more from you.
Have a nice weekend.

Kelli
Irina Shamaeva said:
Hi Kelli,

The main point about Diver (that helps set the right expectations) is that it is a tool on top of search engines. Diver doesn't search; what it does is - it very quickly and efficiently processes your search results.
It doesn't have its own syntax; the syntax to be used on Google is Google's etc.

To use Diver one needs to be good at Boolean search. Strings that I use with Diver are somewhat different than the strings I use if I manually collect results, at least in one aspect: it's OK getting several hundred results (many more than "usual") because the collection of the info is automated.
I'll add more to this later and will try to address your other questions.

I wrote an article that has examples of searches a while ago and it's here: http://thetalentbuzz.com/2008/08/i-disagree-with-donato-diorio/

It would be interesting to hear how others use Diver.

Irina
To add to my earlier reply, I think that many people who try Diver expect it to be doing some magic regarding the searches. It doesn't and is it not actually supposed to search. You use Diver together with Google or other search engines. So questions on how to find LinkedIn profiles or how to find directories are actually questions about Google or Yahoo, not about Diver. Those are good questions, of course.

Questions about parsing information on a profile (or any other questions on parsing) are about Diver. I believe that Diver 2.0 can do a better job parsing LinkedIn profiles.

Along the same lines, Diver doesn't search for resumes. It can parse resumes that you find when you search on Google, for example.
I rarely use Diver for collecting resumes though. (Diver has TWO modes: one is collecting resumes, another is collecting contact info.) I like using Diver to generate lists of contact information for potential candidates. Sometimes I do search for resumes on Google but all I do with the search is collect contact information using Diver. I discussed how I work with those lists and "validate" the collected information in the Advanced Secret webinar a few weeks ago; if there are more interested people, I can repeat it.

Diver is great if you are good at searching. It expands one's productivity many times.
Irina:
Is there any fee involved with the diver.
I use contact capture though sometimes, but I guess there is a annual fee for the Diver product.

Raj
Raj,
Yes, there is, and it is expensive. I believe the current cost is around $2K but I do not know the exact pricing. For an advanced sourcer it's worth the money though, I think.

Raj said:
Irina:
Is there any fee involved with the diver.
I use contact capture though sometimes, but I guess there is a annual fee for the Diver product.

Raj
Hi Kelli

Have you used eGrabber products such as ResumeFinder, ResumeGrabber and now LeadResearcher.

These products come with all boolean strings you need to grab resumes/profiles and conduct Internet research on candidates.

For example, with LinkedIn or other profiles, you get name/company/title but no contact details.
LeadResearcher can help you get missing contact details such email, phone etc.
also gets you email IDs of other people in the company if they are on the Internet.

Free trial versions are available at www.egrabber.com
Call us if you want a demo 408-705-1106

thanks
Chandra
Chandra is making a good point: his product ResumeGrabber does parsing (of resumes), and the product ResumeFinder suggests ways to search. You would still use Google or another search engine with the ResumeGrabber/ResumeFinder combination, but you have a "pre-cooked" string collection to use and modify for your needs.

Leadresearcher is a new eGrabber product and it deserves a separate discussion item; I am currently trying it out and will post an overview soon.
I would be interested in the trial if it's longer than 3 days.

Thank you,

Kelli

chandra bodapati said:
Hi Kelli

Have you used eGrabber products such as ResumeFinder, ResumeGrabber and now LeadResearcher.

These products come with all boolean strings you need to grab resumes/profiles and conduct Internet research on candidates.

For example, with LinkedIn or other profiles, you get name/company/title but no contact details.
LeadResearcher can help you get missing contact details such email, phone etc.
also gets you email IDs of other people in the company if they are on the Internet.

Free trial versions are available at www.egrabber.com
Call us if you want a demo 408-705-1106

thanks
Chandra

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