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Hello All,

 

Here is today’s Quiz. Please post your answers as replies.

Replying only to some questions, and replying several times is allowed. Repeating someone’s correct answer is fine but will score lower, unless you add some nice explanations or examples. (So the sooner you get some answers in, the more advantage you have!) Repeating an incorrect answer will give you disadvantage. The winner will be announced next week.

The prize is either a 1 hour sourcing training with me, or two guest passes to future sourcing webinars (the winner’s choice).

Ready? 

  1. What profile information can you search for by X-raying LinkedIn on Google and cannot using LinkedIn people search (at any level of LinkedIn people search –including the advanced search on LinkedIn Recruiter)? Please give an example.
  2. What search string would create different results on Yahoo and Bing (would do something useful in the yahoo.com search box and would not on bing.com)?
  3. What % of posts on “open” groups on LinkedIn can be indexed by search engines?
  4. What can you search for, using a Google custom search engine, that you cannot using the Google search? [Bonus: is there a way to search on Bing using a Google’s CSE?]
  5. What are the differences between search results you get by X-raying Google-plus (site: site:plus.google.com <keywords>) and searching within Google-plus (on https://plus.google.com/)?
  6. If you searched on Google and it shows (about) 13,000 results found, what (if anything) can you conclude from that?
  7. How is search on Google for *@accenture.com (plus some keywords) different from searching for *\accenture.com ? You can replace “Accenture” for a company name of your liking. Please explain and give an example.
  8. How would you X-ray LinkedIn (on either Google or Bing) to find profiles of sales managers with MBA selling software, located near Chicago, who have a phone number mentioned in their profile?
  9. Is it possible that a public LinkedIn profile would show more info than a profile viewed by a LinkedIn member who is logged in?
  10. Take a look at the Google help page: http://bit.ly/rsMDVe. What special character that used to be in Google’s cheat sheet is not listed anymore and why?
  11. If you have someone’s profile on LinkedIn, what are some ways to find the person’s email address?

Tags: boolean, contest, quiz, sourcing

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1)  If you have someone’s profile on LinkedIn, what are some ways to find the person’s email address?

Ans:  First of all will find out with domains like gmail, yahoo, hotmail etc (Patterns Exp: john.miller or jmiller or j.miller etc and validate with linkedin import tool. If I am not able to find his personal email id. Then will find out his/her current company's email domain and email pattern. Sometimes I use to verify company email through linkedin. Mostly I use excel to create email patterns for any domain. It makes patterns in matter of seconds.

Mostly I will get personal email ids.

Thanks and let me know your feedback on my attempt on finding emails.

Prem

 

 

One more to my post which is most important before attempting all these technics to in finding emails where we can find his/her contact number within linkedin if he mentions when signing up.

Here are 2 quick answers as i'm pressed for time- will to try to cycle back if my time permits:

 

Q: If you searched on Google and it shows (about) 13,000 results found, what (if anything) can you conclude from that?

A: Google only gives an 'estimate' when giving numbers of results, you can conclude that you will only see 1,000 results maximum as that is Google's limit;

 

Q: If you have someones profile on LI, what are some ways to find the person's email address?

A: There are many ways, but one that is highly successful is

In Google:
"email * * companyname.com" (Use quotes & replace companyname with company u want to find)

OR
"*@companyname.com (Use quotes & replace companyname with company u want to find)

In BING:
email NEAR:2 companyname.com (Capitalize NEAR since it's an operator in BING & replace companyname with the actual company/corp u want to find)

Once you obtain the results, start looking for patterns of firstname.lastname@companyname.com or firstinitial.lastname@companyname.com, etc. When you see consistent patterns, you can test the email address to see if it's valid at these sites:

http://mailtester.comhttp://verifyemailaddress.org

Here are some sites that automatically look up email address formats for you (NOTE: They don't have 'all' sites listed):

http://sites.google.com/site/emails4corporations/http://executivebomb.com

Hi everyone,

 

Great points, Gary. I didn't know about 'executivebomb.com' that's cool.

 

One warning I'd like to give people about Mailtester/verifyemailaddress -  'verifyemailaddress.org' will tell you an email address exists in cases where a catch all is in place on the mail server. For example, if you were to look at my email address (see my LI, i don't want to post it everywhere) verifyemailaddress.org will say, 'yes, that exists.' similarly, if you type a bunch of gibberish and then add my companies domain, it will also verify the address.

 

In contrast, mailtester will tell you it can't verify that, which isn't overly helpful, but i think better no info than false info!

 

Cheers,

J

gary cozin said:

Here are 2 quick answers as i'm pressed for time- will to try to cycle back if my time permits:

 

Q: If you searched on Google and it shows (about) 13,000 results found, what (if anything) can you conclude from that?

A: Google only gives an 'estimate' when giving numbers of results, you can conclude that you will only see 1,000 results maximum as that is Google's limit;

 

Q: If you have someones profile on LI, what are some ways to find the person's email address?

A: There are many ways, but one that is highly successful is

In Google:
"email * * companyname.com" (Use quotes & replace companyname with company u want to find)

OR
"*@companyname.com (Use quotes & replace companyname with company u want to find)

In BING:
email NEAR:2 companyname.com (Capitalize NEAR since it's an operator in BING & replace companyname with the actual company/corp u want to find)

Once you obtain the results, start looking for patterns of firstname.lastname@companyname.com or firstinitial.lastname@companyname.com, etc. When you see consistent patterns, you can test the email address to see if it's valid at these sites:

http://mailtester.comhttp://verifyemailaddress.org

Here are some sites that automatically look up email address formats for you (NOTE: They don't have 'all' sites listed):

http://sites.google.com/site/emails4corporations/http://executivebomb.com

1. phone numbers, websites and email addresses

"websites*resume" site:www.linkedin.com inurl:in | inurl:pub -inurl:dir -inurl:jobs

2.?

3. 100%

4.  I think the CSE in Google would hone into results reducing junk if searching a particular site.

5. indexes

6. The estimates in Google are not reliable.  This doesn't mean your search produce too much JUNK.

7. The first will result with email, and the second gives links associated with the company.

8. "sales manager" "MBA" "software" "Chicago" site:www.linkedin.com "call me at ***" inurl:in | inurl:pub - inurl:dir -inurl:jobs

9. Yes.  The basic level viewer can be very limited.  By x-raying via search engine a person can pull up last names, experience, and references that might otherwise not be viewable.

10. My guess is | for or.

11. For the company that the person currently works for, find the pattern of the company email:  "email**companyname.com" -rfp

Cross reference via Jigsaw or Zoominfo.

Great answers Heather - thanks!

Heather Rahman said:

1. phone numbers, websites and email addresses

"websites*resume" site:www.linkedin.com inurl:in | inurl:pub -inurl:dir -inurl:jobs

2.?

3. 100%

4.  I think the CSE in Google would hone into results reducing junk if searching a particular site.

5. indexes

6. The estimates in Google are not reliable.  This doesn't mean your search produce too much JUNK.

7. The first will result with email, and the second gives links associated with the company.

8. "sales manager" "MBA" "software" "Chicago" site:www.linkedin.com "call me at ***" inurl:in | inurl:pub - inurl:dir -inurl:jobs

9. Yes.  The basic level viewer can be very limited.  By x-raying via search engine a person can pull up last names, experience, and references that might otherwise not be viewable.

10. My guess is | for or.

11. For the company that the person currently works for, find the pattern of the company email:  "email**companyname.com" -rfp

Cross reference via Jigsaw or Zoominfo.

Let me try...

 

  • What can you search for, using a Google custom search engine, that you cannot using the Google search? [Bonus: is there a way to search on Bing using a Google’s CSE?]

 

Google has some limitations in terms of # of (key)words so that you can add only thirtysomething words into the search box. A Google CSE can contain some pre-selected sites, keywords and/or operators you want to surely use during your search and you will then not need to add them again into your string. With that you can add lot more 'real' keywords into one search.

 

For instance, if you pre-select to add all of the resume-related keywords and operators into a CSE (such as intitle:(resume OR CV OR vitae) and ext:(pdf OR doc) etc.) then by using this CSE you can focus only on the necessary keywords.

 

Hope it makes sense?

Balazs

Thanks for the reply! Yes, it's a major advantage to CSE's vs. Google.

Balazs Paroczay said:

Let me try...

 

  • What can you search for, using a Google custom search engine, that you cannot using the Google search? [Bonus: is there a way to search on Bing using a Google’s CSE?]

 

Google has some limitations in terms of # of (key)words so that you can add only thirtysomething words into the search box. A Google CSE can contain some pre-selected sites, keywords and/or operators you want to surely use during your search and you will then not need to add them again into your string. With that you can add lot more 'real' keywords into one search.

 

For instance, if you pre-select to add all of the resume-related keywords and operators into a CSE (such as intitle:(resume OR CV OR vitae) and ext:(pdf OR doc) etc.) then by using this CSE you can focus only on the necessary keywords.

 

Hope it makes sense?

Balazs


  • Take a look at the Google help page: http://bit.ly/rsMDVe. What special character that used to be in Google’s cheat sheet is not listed anymore and why?

 

Parenthesis is not listed there maybe because a search string is linear? We used to use it mainly for the OR-related keywords and if Google needs to bring all of these results it does not really make sense to use () any further.

 

...not more than a simple guess, Irina!

Hint: find a copy of an old cheatsheet that used to be on Google. :)

Balazs Paroczay said:

  • Take a look at the Google help page: http://bit.ly/rsMDVe. What special character that used to be in Google’s cheat sheet is not listed anymore and why?

 

Parenthesis is not listed there maybe because a search string is linear? We used to use it mainly for the OR-related keywords and if Google needs to bring all of these results it does not really make sense to use () any further.

 

...not more than a simple guess, Irina!

  • What are the differences between search results you get by X-raying Google-plus (site: site:plus.google.com <keywords>) and searching within Google-plus (on https://plus.google.com/)?

 

There should be many... One is that Google-plus does not realize quads but x-raying can help well you in it.

 

Sample string:

site:plus.google.com "University of Maryland at College Park"

to compare to: http://www.google.com/search?q=%22University+of+Maryland+at+College... 

Hmmm... maybe this one:~? ...as Google automatically searches for synonymes today?



Irina Shamaeva said:

Hint: find a copy of an old cheatsheet that used to be on Google. :)

Balazs Paroczay said:

  • Take a look at the Google help page: http://bit.ly/rsMDVe. What special character that used to be in Google’s cheat sheet is not listed anymore and why?

 

Parenthesis is not listed there maybe because a search string is linear? We used to use it mainly for the OR-related keywords and if Google needs to bring all of these results it does not really make sense to use () any further.

 

...not more than a simple guess, Irina!

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